Archives For Cinderella’s Dress

Sale ends sometime today! Scoop it up while you can.

Cinderellas dress 99c sale

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Entangled TEEN launched a new winter promo for some of their backlist fantasy titles. If you missed any of these the first time around, make yourself some hot chocolate and check them out now.

The ebook sales last anywhere from two to four weeks. (Note, my title is way at the end there…last week in March!) To learn which title is on sale, follow Entangled TEEN on Twitter, Facebook, or check out the website.

Attention Amazon Customers

January 15, 2016

If you purchased a copy of Cinderella’s Dress direct from Amazon (not a third party) between October and January, and haven’t received it, thank you for your incredible patience. Unfortunately, all those orders are being cancelled. *insert long story involving publisher decisions and technology glitches*

The first edition of Cinderella’s Dress will be going out of print to allow the second edition to be published. The title itself is not out of print, just the first edition.

The new ISBN is 978-1682810231.

Here is the link to the second edition so you can re-order: Cinderella’s Dress. Please note, there is a price increase. Also, Amazon has not yet cancelled the open orders…even though they will never be filled. I don’t know what is going on.

Again, thank you for your patience! I so appreciate your interest in my stories.

$1.39 Black Friday-Dec 1st sale!!!!

Have I found a deal for you! While Amazon and Barnes & Noble are having some trouble stocking Cinderella’s Dress, copies of the first and second printing are being sold at a discount this weekend for only $1.39 at Book Outlet.  Yes, you heard me right. Only $1.39. What are you waiting for? Buy one for you and one for a friend. Then you’ll be all caught up to read the sequel Cinderella’s Shoes.

cinderellas dress cover

W is for Window Dressers

April 27, 2015

For the A to Z blogging challenge I’ve decided to blog about the 1940′s. And in the spirit of the 1940′s, at the end of the month, I’ll be giving away an ebook copy of one of my favorite books, Summer at Tiffany, to one of my newsletter subscribers (sign-up on the sidebar if you are so inclined.) It’s a light-hearted memoir of two college girls let loose in New York City for a summer. What a hoot.

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World War II opened up numerous opportunities for women in the work force. Even jobs that I didn’t know were once male-dominated, for example: department store window dressing.


Jan Whitaker in her book Service and Style: How the American Department Store Fashioned the Middle Class writes:

“Until the personnel shortage of World War II, department store window display staff were all male.”

I had never heard of this before, and it brought up all kinds of images in my mind. Why were display staff all male? When I was a teenager, I got to help put in window displays and it was a lot of fun. (My gut told me there was a story there…hence my 1940’s YA novel Cinderella’s Dress where my main character wants to be a window dresser!)


The reasons I found for the lack of women in department store window dressing: the job was physically demanding, it took place over night, and in cramped spaces shared with men, and, at least in New York during the early 40s, women could only work until 10:00pm.)

“Display work was primarily a nocturnal and thus all-male activity. Not by choice. It was then a common belief that window trimming was too physically demanding for women, and according to a New York State law of that period, females were not permitted to work past ten o’clock at night. I had only three women on my staff, and they had to depart long before the window-dressing hours arrived.” -Gene Moore, My Time at Tiffany’s


Earlier in the A to Z challenge I wrote about Gene Moore, a window display artist. He writes about women gaining a foothold in this field during the war years, starting with the big department stores. He also talks about the lighting restrictions such as no spotlights allowed, and the windows had to be covered with blackout curtains. They often included bond drives and Red Cross appeals in their windows.

Another interesting fact I learned was that in France, store windows were kept up even thought the stores themselves might be nearly empty. A way for the occupying forces to keep up appearances as it were.

I haven’t found a good video about window dressing in the 1940’s yet, but I thought this one was interesting. Around the three minute mark starts the footage of shop-keeping during the Blitz.

T is for Tupperware

April 23, 2015

For the A to Z blogging challenge I’ve decided to blog about the 1940′s. And in the spirit of the 1940′s, at the end of the month, I’ll be giving away an ebook copy of one of my favorite books, Summer at Tiffany, to one of my newsletter subscribers (sign-up on the sidebar if you are so inclined.) It’s a light-hearted memoir of two college girls let loose in New York City for a summer. What a hoot.
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Tupperware hit department store shelves around 1946 (alas, no agreement across websites, but the very brief history mentioned on the Tupperware company website says 1946 so we’ll go with them.) Named after the inventor, chemist Earl Silas Tupper, these innovative products were slow to catch on. People couldn’t see from the display how different these products were. They couldn’t hear the seal “burp.” Or drop the product and see that it didn’t break.

Enter single mom Brownie Wise. She knew how to sell Tupperware. She already worked direct sales for Stanley Home products, selling brushes and cleaning supplies in home parties. She is the one who made Tupperware a hit, holding the first Tupperware party in 1948, and launching the phenomenon of Tupperization in the 1950’s.

To learn more: Stay a Stay-at-Home Mom or The History of Tupperware Parties

 

For the A to Z blogging challenge I’ve decided to blog about the 1940′s. And in the spirit of the 1940′s, at the end of the month, I’ll be giving away an ebook copy of one of my favorite books, Summer at Tiffany, to one of my newsletter subscribers (sign-up on the sidebar if you are so inclined.) It’s a light-hearted memoir of two college girls let loose in New York City for a summer. What a hoot.

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Seventeen first hit the magazine rack in September, 1944. Teen-ager was a new word on the scene, and Seventeen the first magazine aimed directly at teens. Seventeen was actually born out of a renovated version of a movie-magazine called Stardom. The publisher was looking for fresh ideas and contacted Helen Valentine, who had worked for both Vogue and Mademoiselle: The Magazine for Smart Young Women. She had the right vision, and he hired her.

Excerpts from the editor’s first letter to the readers:

“You’re going to have to run this show—so the sooner you start thinking about it, the better. In a world that is changing as quickly and profoundly as ours is, we hope to provide a clearing house for your ideas…..As a magazine, we shall discuss all the things you consider important—with plenty of help from you, please. Write us about anything or everything. Say you agree with SEVENTEEN or disagree violently, say we’re tops, say we’re terrible, say anything you please—but say it!” – Helen Valentine

When I was collecting research for my 1940’s YA novels, I purchased several old Seventeen magazines. These large editions were a lot of fun to breeze through. One of the magazines had a great article about different kinds of technical high schools, so I sent one of my supporting characters to a school for fashion design. (Her picture is even in the magazine!)

In this video, I show you those magazines and read some of the reader’s letters to the editor:

 

For more info and glimpses of past covers, check out this article:  When We Were Seventeen.

For the A to Z blogging challenge I’ve decided to blog about the 1940′s. And in the spirit of the 1940′s, at the end of the month, I’ll be giving away an ebook copy of one of my favorite books, Summer at Tiffany, to one of my newsletter subscribers (sign-up on the sidebar if you are so inclined.) It’s a light-hearted memoir of two college girls let loose in New York City for a summer. What a hoot

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June 6, 1944, President Roosevelt got on the radio for a solemn announcement. The night before, he’d told of the fall of Rome, but now he was announcing a massive, secret operation was well underway and it was time for the nation to pray. With an estimated audience of 100 million listeners, this is what he prayed (text is below the video):

My fellow Americans: Last night, when I spoke with you about the fall of Rome, I knew at that moment that troops of the United States and our allies were crossing the Channel in another and greater operation. It has come to pass with success thus far.

And so, in this poignant hour, I ask you to join with me in prayer:

Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.

Lead them straight and true; give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith.

They will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again; and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

They will be sore tried, by night and by day, without rest-until the victory is won. The darkness will be rent by noise and flame. Men’s souls will be shaken with the violences of war.

For these men are lately drawn from the ways of peace. They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They fight to let justice arise, and tolerance and good will among all Thy people. They yearn but for the end of battle, for their return to the haven of home.

Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.

And for us at home — fathers, mothers, children, wives, sisters, and brothers of brave men overseas — whose thoughts and prayers are ever with them–help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith in Thee in this hour of great sacrifice.

Many people have urged that I call the Nation into a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask that our people devote themselves in a continuance of prayer. As we rise to each new day, and again when each day is spent, let words of prayer be on our lips, invoking Thy help to our efforts.

Give us strength, too — strength in our daily tasks, to redouble the contributions we make in the physical and the material support of our armed forces.

And let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons wheresoever they may be.

And, O Lord, give us Faith. Give us Faith in Thee; Faith in our sons; Faith in each other; Faith in our united crusade. Let not the keenness of our spirit ever be dulled. Let not the impacts of temporary events, of temporal matters of but fleeting moment let not these deter us in our unconquerable purpose.

With Thy blessing, we shall prevail over the unholy forces of our enemy. Help us to conquer the apostles of greed and racial arrogancies. Lead us to the saving of our country, and with our sister Nations into a world unity that will spell a sure peace a peace invulnerable to the schemings of unworthy men. And a peace that will let all of men live in freedom, reaping the just rewards of their honest toil.

Thy will be done, Almighty God.

Amen.

For the A to Z blogging challenge I’ve decided to blog about the 1940′s. And in the spirit of the 1940′s, at the end of the month, I’ll be giving away an ebook copy of one of my favorite books, Summer at Tiffany, to one of my newsletter subscribers (sign-up on the sidebar if you are so inclined.) It’s a light-hearted memoir of two college girls let loose in New York City for a summer. What a hoot

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During most of WWII the United States barred large groups of refugees from entering the country. It wasn’t until the summer of 1944 when the war was nearing the end, that a “Safe Haven” was allowed at Fort Ontario in Oswago, New York. Only about a thousand refugees were chosen in Italy, most of them of Jewish descent, to make the special trip over. So few, when so many were in need.


They were housed at the empty fort, kept behind a barb-wire topped fence. Their status was a strange one–guests without Visas, not allowed to work or leave the area. At the end of the war, many of them were finally allowed to apply for immigrant status. Of those who stayed, many left their mark on America in amazing ways. You can read more about them in the book Haven: The Dramatic Story of 1,000 World War II Refugees and How They Came to America by Ruth Gruber. She was the one tasked with the job of sailing with the refugees and helping them make the transition to the shelter. Fascinating piece of history.

N is for Nylon Stockings

April 15, 2015

For the A to Z blogging challenge I’ve decided to blog about the 1940′s. And in the spirit of the 1940′s, at the end of the month, I’ll be giving away an ebook copy of one of my favorite books, Summer at Tiffany, to one of my newsletter subscribers (sign-up on the sidebar if you are so inclined.) It’s a light-hearted memoir of two college girls let loose in New York City for a summer. What a hoot.

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This once staple of women’s fashion has an interesting history, particularly through the 1940’s. Invented in a lab at DuPont, nylon, the first synthetic fiber, filled a void in the silk stocking market when imports from Japan became problematic due to the war (at first boycotted, and then later the imports ceased). Nylon stockings first went on sale in Wilmington, Del in October 1939, nationally in May 1940 and were an instant hit. Unfortunately, as the war continued on, nylon use, like so many other products, was diverted to the war effort. In this case, for parachutes.

Source: Time Magazine: The War that Shaped Women’s Legs

So what was a girl to do? Why, fake it. Here is a quote from an interview with Marjorie Hart, the author of Summer at Tiffany (the book I’m giving away to one of my subscribers this month…check the sidebar!)

As for the lack of nylons, the girls made do with rayon stockings (“The minute you sat down, they were baggy,”) or they painted their legs with a product called Stocking Stick. “If you weren’t tan, it made your legs look tan. If you wanted to go farther, you took an eyebrow pencil and made a seam.” But Stocking Stick wasn’t without its issues. “When we went to the beach, we laughed so hard because we saw this gal go into the water in her bathing suit, but the Stocking Stick only went up to right above the knees.” And the girls learned to avoid Stocking Stick if they would be dancing with a guy dressed in Navy whites, as there was a danger of transfer. “They did not appreciate that,” she remembers.USD Magazine
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M is for Monuments Men

April 14, 2015

For the A to Z blogging challenge I’ve decided to blog about the 1940′s. And in the spirit of the 1940′s, at the end of the month, I’ll be giving away an ebook copy of one of my favorite books, Summer at Tiffany, to one of my newsletter subscribers (sign-up on the sidebar if you are so inclined.) It’s a light-hearted memoir of two college girls let loose in New York City for a summer. What a hoot.

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I learned of the work of the Monuments Men about a year before I first heard about the movie starring George Clooney. The Monuments Men were those men and women whose job it was to protect the art, significant monuments, and architecture in Europe during WWII. They were few workers for such a large task. After the war, their jobs turned into recovery and restoration as they searched for all the stolen artwork hidden in treasure troves around Europe.

The Monuments Men story was instantly captivating to my imagination. You can read descriptions of how the art was stolen and hidden and then recovered, but the photos are really what you want to see. Amazing. Here are some books, and of course, a video that shows many of these archival photos. The second book, Rescuing Da Vinci, is the one with the most pictures.